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London Street Photography - April Meetups
01st April 2016 - 0 comments


Here are this month's street photo walk events coming up with We Shoot People, a Meetup group for beginner and intermediate photographers with an interest or passion for street photography.

These social based street photography weekly events are great introductory way to get out about and explore London, meet fellow street photographers in a very friendly environment, and hone your street photography skills!

April Street Photography walks coming up!

  • Brick Lane/Shoreditch - Street Safari Sundays - 3rd April

  • Camden Town - Midweek evening - 7th April

  • Vaisakhi Festival @ London Bridge - 9th April

  • Covent Garden / Seven Dials - Midweek Walk 13th April

  • St. Christopher's Place - Midweek Photo Walk - 20th April

  • Brixton Village & Markets - Photo Walk - 23rd April


Its very simple. Just sign up & RSVP to join us for some street photography this month!
http://www.meetup.com/We-Shoot-People-Street-Photography/

If you wish to hone your skills even further and take your images to the next level, I offer beginner & intermediate 1-2-1 tuition in London and beyond.
Symmetry of Strangers
29th March 2016 - 0 comments
As humans, I think most of us feel the need to connect with other human beings in some way, whether instinctively or subconsciously. As a street photographer, I often always notice the 'mirroring' behaviours of others, which I find interesting to observe from both a photography & psychology point of view. It is quite entertaining to watch complete strangers engage in these mannerisms, especially if you are an avid people watcher like me, equipped with a camera!



"Mirroring is the behaviour in which one person subconsciously imitates the gesture, speech pattern, or attitude of another. Mirroring often occurs in social situations, particularly in the company of close friends or family. The concept often affects other individual's notions about the individual that is exhibiting mirroring behaviour, which can lead to the individual building rapport with others.



Mirroring is the subconscious replication of another person's nonverbal signals. This concept takes place in everyday interactions, and often goes unnoticed by both the person enacting the mirroring behaviour as well as the individual who is being mirrored. The activation of mirror neurons takes place within the individual who begins to mirror another's movements, and allows them a greater connection and understanding with the individual who they are mirroring, as well as allowing the individual who is being mirrored to feel a stronger connection with the other individual."


Steve McCurry Exhibition - Beetles & Huxley gallery
19th March 2016 - 0 comments
Today was the last day of a Steve McCurry exhibition at Beetles & Huxley gallery in Piccadilly, London. The exbitiion displayed a cross-section of works from his long photography career. If you have never heard of Steve McCurry, he is a veteran photojournalist spanning over 30 years. His most well known portrait, known as the Afghan Girl, which became one of the most iconic images of the twentieth century after it was featured as cover of National Geographic magazine.



Happy St. Patrick's Day
17th March 2016 - 0 comments
Happy St. Patrick's Day !



Kids with the best view, watching the St. Patrick's Day parade, London 2012.
Etsy London photography print sale
12th March 2016 - 0 comments


Recently sold on Etsy...
8 x 10" print: Embankment tube station, London 2012
fine art print to a buyer from Chicago IL, USA
1-2-1 Street Photography Workshop Review
11th March 2016 - 0 comments


Mark, a member of We Shoot People, came along to my Brixton Meetup group event about a month ago, I remember distinctly because it was the first time I had been to Brixton as a street photographer (and coincidentally the same morning I went to visit the David Bowie fan memorial in the area). Mark expressed some interest in a 1-2-1 street photography session with me and we kept in touch via emails so I could get a better idea of what he was looking to learn and how I could mentor his street photography. I typed up a customised agenda of street photography topics and areas I knew Mark specifically wanted to work through, and we scheduled to have half an afternoon of daylight / half night photo shoot around central London on a weekend.



Needless to say, Mark was the model student, very inquisitive, enthusiastic, had a good eye for street moments, and luckily as I do a lot of talking as I walk, soaked up everything I was saying. Overall, it was a very fun afternoon for me and he made my task as a tutor very easy to do. I asked Mark if he wouldn't mind sharing a few of his favourite pics from the day.



I’m a novice photographer with a little under 3 years experience. I met Linda through her ‘We Shoot People’ street photography meet up group after accidentally stumbling on her images online about ‘active street photographers in the UK’.

This was an absolutely nerve-wracking experience for me but Linda made me feel at ease over a coffee and ran through a list of small initial tips to help me get started. We walked and talked around areas of Seven Dials, Soho, Park Lane, Mayfair and Oxford Circus, finding countless interesting areas and listening to her talk about her ‘process’ of looking for opportunities. It was a very rewarding experience and I felt I learnt a great deal about everything from composition to processing.

I can’t recommend this 1-2-1 session highly enough, nor the meet-up group for those eager to learn the basics of street or candid photography. On top of a great day’s tutoring, I also had Linda look at a few of my favourite shots and give her opinion on my thought process in the capture and also of my image itself. I won’t win any prizes for the overall images I took but it was a vast improvement on everything I had attempted beforehand and look forward to repeating this lesson in a few months time.

Great company and a great day’s photography. Mark
1-2-1 street photography vs group workshops
10th March 2016 - 0 comments


I recently had a 1-2-1 street photography workshop session booked with Mark, a member of my We Shoot People Meetup group recently. I started a beginner group because at a time when there were no other similar London street photography groups offering that service to beginner photographers interested in street photography, to meet their peers in a social way for photo walks around the city.

People ask me why I teach 1-2-1 street photography workshops, and not group sessions? The answer I give, is purely down to my own experience, as I HAVE done small group sessions before in the past. Is mainly down to the simple fact of knowing that most, if not all the students who attend, are at different levels when it comes to street photography, both technically and creatively.

I have taught group workshops, which were fine, but I had to teach it in a more generic way, where it was more like 'one size fits all teaching. In contrast, when someone approaches me about street photography tuition, I have to work a little harder and I am challenged (in a good way), as I get to tailor a workshop just for that one student. I start by getting to know them personally in terms of a photographer, try to understand what specific topics they hope to get out of tuition with me, their tastes and influences in photography and art, their current level of experience, and where they want to be, in say a year from now, etc.



If I asked 10 different beginners these types of questions, I would typically get 10 different answers, because photography is not generic, it is subjective and personal. There is no one size fits all when it comes to art & photography. So why teach that way? Based on your personal influences, who inspires you, why you started photography and why you want to creatively pursue it, plus many other factors will change your answers. By customising a workshop based around a student, it makes a session much more fun and productive.

So, when a keen novice photographer like Mark approaches me for mentoring, tips, tricks, advice. I explain to them that I will teach them all that I know in techniques and training, how I approach taking a street photo in the best composition, dealing with tricky subjects, technically taking the shot, post processing, etc. but once the session is over it is the ongoing practice and training of the eye thereafter that they will need to keep up to improve their photos.

I get more satisfaction from helping a student 1-2-1, to bring out their strongest qualities, improving on any weak spots I can spot whether creatively or technically, push them to find their own creative identity in their journey, and discovering their own style.

My mentoring continues post 1-2-1 session. I ask students to email me their favourite shots from our workshop. I then give 'constructive' feedback and any post editing tips they need. During and at least by the end of a session, I can usually see a marked improvement on not only a student's confidence but also in their photos!
Soho at night in the rain
09th March 2016 - 0 comments


Ed's Diner at night in Soho, London. I used to moan about our British weather, especially the rain, now I go out in it and take photos! :)

Available to buy as a lush colour print!
Kind words from a website visitor
02nd March 2016 - 0 comments
It brightens up my day when I receive lovely messages about my photos, like this one from a chap named Rex who emailed me recently. Thanks for your kind words Rex, most appreciated! :-)

Oh, the photo Rex is referring to is the one below, that I took in Brick Lane, London | 2011.



Huffington Post - All Women Everywhere Portraits
01st March 2016 - 0 comments


Street Portraits from a photoshoot I did for a month long Huffington Post UK project called All Women Everywhere.

HuffPost UK will be providing a platform to reflect the diverse mix of female experience and voices in Britain today. Through features, video and blogs, we'll be exploring the issues facing women specific to their age, ethnicity, social status, sexuality and gender identity. Read the full article here.
Day In The Life Of... Peter Alberti
28th February 2016 - 0 comments
I just completed a photoshoot with London actor recently, with Peter Alberti, in a 'Day In The Life' themed shoot. All images were made in Central London. Here are some highlights from the shoot...





As a street photographer, I enjoy getting hired to do portrait photoshoots as I am usually giving full creative control on the making of the images. Its always fun to work with a model 'subject' and also have permission to put my personal 'street photography' stamp on the final results. No fancy gimmicks or kit lighting - just one camera, and two lenses (an Olympus prime 90mm & 50mm) and natural day light!



Piccadilly Circus, London reflections
20th February 2016 - 0 comments
After some heavy rain in London, a nice puddle reflection with just a hint of Piccadilly Circus.
This print is available from my Etsy store.

A sketch of a street portrait photo
11th February 2016 - 0 comments




Occasionally I get requests from artists who want to sketch or paint one of my street portraits. This drawing of my Man and His Dog street portrait photo is by a photographer/artist named Martin Turner.

I am quite impressed with the final results. Apparently it took some 40 hours (give or take and was sketched using Graphite on A3 Bristol Board for all your tech spec fans. What do you think?
David Bowie memorial Brixton London
23rd January 2016 - 0 comments


David Bowie memorial Brixton London

I had a scheduled photo walk Meetup with We Shoot People in Brixton this Saturday afternoon with We Shoot People. So, thought I would get there ahead of schedule to pay a visit to the Bowie memorial wall first as I felt I needed to go and say goodbye to the Starman.

I was pretty taken aback to be honest with the ever growing shrine of flowers, fan memorabilia, & personal gifts left by mourning fans, two weeks on from his passing on 10th January 2016. I saw a few people in tears, still adding tribute messages on the walls by the artwork mural. Sad, reflective, overwhelming, but amazing love in the air for the David Bowie. You are truly missed.
Covent Garden Meetup - London Street Photography
13th January 2016 - 0 comments


Happy New Year! T'was my first Meetup of 2016 with the We Shoot People group, after a break over the festive holidays. Amazing how short a time it takes for you to get rusty with the eyes, (well for me anyway). Well, it wasn't long before I was back in a zone, after first warming up my camera with some test shots and most importantly warming ME up, it was cold out there tonight. Frozen hands and cameras just do not go!

An hour and a half goes by very quickly in street photography world, but with a full house of freezing cold new members thinking about a pub to warm up in, the photo walk ended on a high with a great social drink and a nice start to the new year.

This print is available from my Etsy store.
Seen in Kensal Green - New Year Resolution Perhaps
01st January 2016 - 0 comments
Seen in Kensal Green, London | 2016 Happy New Year. I hope you had a great christmas and NYE. I also hope at least ONE person made use of this knife bin as a new year resolution!

Top British Street Photographers in 2015
30th November 2015 - 0 comments
Top British Street Photographers in 2015

Thank you to the Interactive Design Institute for naming me one of the Top British Street Photographers in 2015. Each nominated photographer on their list were asked to give their top tips for trying to take the perfect street photography picture, so I contributed a little advice to anyone starting out or new to street :)

Covent Garden Street Photography - London Meetup
18th November 2015 - 0 comments


I hosted another Wednesday Meetup event in central London with my amateur street photography group We Shoot People. This time we explored the areas around Seven Dials, Covent Garden, Leicester Square & Chinatown which are always full of night life subjects and great light.



It never fails to make me smile when new members, (who join one of my photo walks for the first time) ask me what they are meant to be visually looking out for and for creative ideas to start them off, and then watching them get so into 'the zone' that only a street photographer can, once they start to get it! I love seeing their confidence grow over a short space of time. Often even before the event is over they are asking "So, when's the next photo walk?!"
Soho Street Photography - We Shoot People Meetup
11th November 2015 - 0 comments


I arranged another Soho street photography session with We Shoot People Meetup members on Wednesday. For those who attend, unfamiliar with the concept of going out after dark to shoot street, I see the slight apprehension in their eyes when I explain what my night photo walks are about.

They have grasped day time shooting and their camera settings, but get them to see the world with low light and push their cameras to the max, work with just the natural lighting around (no flashes, no tripods), just a prime lens and you have a new way of thinking. Not only have you got to find interesting subjects or content, but you also have to be alert about the best way to capture your composition in terms of avoiding it being too dark, too blown out, too blurred because you have not had to push your camera that far before. I find it sharpens your photography skills, focuses your eyes and keeps you on your toes.
My Photography & Camera Technology | Light
10th November 2015 - 0 comments
Throughout my whole life I have had an interest in photography. I am the youngest and only girl in my family (I have three older brothers!); my youngest of my elder brothers teases me that there are no baby photos of him, yet tons of baby photos of me! I guess my parents decided that they wanted to document their one and only girl in photography. My dad owned a Polaroid Instant camera and my mum a Kodak film camera. I remember being taught how to load film and take photos from an early age.



I remember holiday snap shots and trips to the Margate and other seaside days out and excitedly handing over the roll of film to the pharmacy and the anticipation of getting the photos back a few days later.

As I got older I still enjoyed photography and started using those disposable film cameras or borrowing a compact digital camera to use, but it was just something I did on special occasions like birthdays, holidays, a music concert, etc. During this time my passion was music and I had various jobs and projects that meant I didn’t realise my passion for photography until summer 2009.





A friend of mine, Andreas Wheeler was already a photographer and I expressed an interest in learning to master the basics of a DSLR camera, from having used those small cameras for snapshot photos on automatic settings. Andreas loaned me a spare Sigma SD14 and a couple lenses and we would meet on weekends and go for photo walks around London as he taught me about shutter speed, aperture, ISO, etc. I remember the Sigma being big, heavy and clunky, but the quality of images was decent. I remember walking for hours and hours, taking photos of everything that caught my eye on our walks. I guess at that stage of learning, I had no real idea what direction my photography would take. I was so hooked on taking photos that I was going out with the camera 3-4 times a week! Any opportunity I could get after work mid week and on weekends.





After about 3 months with the sigma, going out day and night, taking photos of anything and everything, architecture, scenery, objects, experimenting with slow shutter speed shots and different styles of photography. Looking back I can see my images definitely started to clearly focus more and more on people. I was already a ‘people watcher’ but the camera probably magnified this! Candid portraits and moments that I thought captured something interesting. Of course at the time of taking photos of random strangers in the street, I had not even heard of the term ‘street photography’. It was only after posting one particular photo on Flickr, that someone commented that the image reminded him of Henri Cartier-Bresson, and at the time I was thinking ‘who?’! So Googled the name, saw the photos Cartier-Bresson took and it was like I had just uncovered a gold mine of eye candy!! I think that was the day everything changed and I knew this was the genre I wanted to get into and learn more about.





Fast-forward about 6 months, I had since mastered my basic camera settings and had discovered street photography. The Sigma had done its job initially, but I guess I had outgrown it. For my street photography walks now, I knew I wanted a camera much smaller, lighter and faster to capture moments quicker and more discreetly, so I got myself a Canon Powershot G11, which at the time was great and helped me get many shots I am proud off.





About a year later, I decided that I needed something a bit more powerful and with better megapixels and opted for a Canon 60D DSLR with an EF-S17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM lens and a 50mm prime lens. Whilst it was a more modern DSLR than the Sigma and the image quality was great, it had its little flaws like being slow to auto focus in low light and a few other little niggles that didn’t make it the most enjoyable camera for street photography.





Around this time, I also just started to experiment with my new iPhone and liked the fact it was a lot more portable and I felt a lot more invisible to get even closer to my subjects. I knew that smaller bodied cameras that had the power and the qualities of that of a DSLR and lenses and was the way forward.

By around 2011, the ‘mirror-less’ camera new technology was available. I thought to myself I don’t want to have to keep changing cameras too frequently, so I made a list of all the features I wanted my next camera to have and from experience the flaws I wanted to avoid before I decided on my next camera purchase. At the time, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3 ticked all the boxes and was like a godsend to me especially with 20mm, 25mm & 45mm Olympus M.Zuiko prime lenses that I have for it. So much so I still use it for most of my street photography, but also for any commissioned work or projects.





In 2013 I decided to go even smaller and acquired a Sony RX100 as a back up camera, which fits into the palm of my hand and easily slips into my pocket when I want to go for a wander with something lighter and even more portable.

Of course new technology is constantly evolving, and as you grow as a photographer, you will want to continually upgrade to newer cameras and features that meet your needs and demands. Whether in speed, ease of use, image quality and/or portability. The most recent new technology I’ve read about is the LIGHT L16, a NEW CAMERA TECHNOLOGY that integrates 16 lenses onto one slim, streamlined camera body that boasts DSLR quality. Imagine having a camera body, 3 fast prime lenses fit right into your pocket. With up to 52 megapixel resolution, this camera is going to be a game changer.